CBC Toronto is a proud sponsor of this year’s Pride Toronto Human Rights Panels. Join us for a series of conversations throughout the month. We will be tackling topics such as gender fluidity on-screen, LGBTIQ refugees and a number of panels will reflect this year’s Pride theme, “35 Years of AIDS Activism.”

The below information will be updated as more details are released:

Youth HIV Presentation

Sunday, June 10, 2018, 7:00pm – 8:30pm

The CBC Barbara Frum Atrium, 250 Front St. W, Toronto, ON, M5V 3G6

ADRIAN R. BETTS, Executive Director. ACDR

A gay man and long-term survivor, Adrian is the Executive Director of the AIDS Committee of Durham Region (ACDR).  Adrian began working in the HIV/AIDS sector in 1989 at the Toronto People with AIDS Foundation and over the years has worked at many HIV service organizations and other social justice services.  Adrian has recently been re-appointed to OACHA; the Ontario Advisory Council on HIV and AIDS to the Provincial Minister of Health.  He is a leader on HIV positive youth and transition issues and facilitated the creation of the Transition Accord for young PHAs transitioning from pediatric to adult HIV care. He is passable cowboy, a terrible surfer and an unapologetic geek who loves Marvel Comics, Star Trek and Doctor Who.

Pathways to Freedom: Struggle and Challenges for LGTBIQ Refugees Globally

Tuesday, June 12, 2018, 7:00 – 8:30 pm

The Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Pl., Toronto, ON, M5S 0A7

Panelists:

Ahmed Alaa Hussein Hussein, Egyptian activist – recently relocated to Canada
Erycom Desire Kizito, Ugandan activist, also recently relocated
Kimahli Powell, Executive Director, Rainbow Railroad

Trans and HIV

Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 7:00 – 8:30pm

The CBC Barbara Frum Atrium, 250 Front St. W, Toronto, ON, M5V 3G6

Description TBD

Ending Unjust HIV Criminalization: A Community Dialogue

Thursday, June 14, 2018, 6:00pm – 7:30pm

The Chelsea Hotel, 33 Gerard St. W, Toronto, ON, M5G 1Z4

Canada (and Ontario) have one of the highest levels of criminalizing people living with HIV in the world, but communities have been mobilizing to resist and the tide may be turning.  What has been achieved, and how?  What work still needs to be done? What lies ahead for resisting HIV criminalization in Ontario following the provincial election?  Join leading activists—people living with HIV, community organizations and human rights advocates—for a community dialogue about where the struggle goes from here. (For more, see www.aidslaw.ca).

In partnership with Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network, HIV & AIDS Legal Clinic Ontario, Ontario Working Group on Criminal Law and HIV Exposure

Non-conforming! Celebrating Fluidity On-screen and IRL

Saturday, June 16, 2018 at 5:00pm

TIFF Bell Lightbox, 350 King St. W, Toronto, ON, M5V 3X5

Panelists: Join us for a celebration of gender non-conforming, trans, fluid and 2-spirit youth who are taking space online by creating radical, self-expressive film and media that builds community and challenges the limits of mainstream gender representation. Creators will share their work and join in a discussion that explores how they are developing their own content and platforms to make space for bigger, better and brighter expressions of multiple and complex identities in the media.

No one will be turned away for lack of funds! Need support getting a ticket, please reach out to: nextwave@tiff.net.

This event is co-presented between Pride Toronto and TIFF.

Living and Thriving with HIV

Tuesday, June 19, 2018, 7:00pm – 8:30pm

Innis Town Hall, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Ave., Toronto, ON M5S 1J5

It is estimated that 60% of persons living with HIV belong to the LGBTQI2+ community, Living with HIV is no easy task especially for those that do not think it affects them. This panel will talk about the positive, the negative and the unknown around HIV, from a lived experience point of view. How important is U=U (undetectable=untransmittable), especially in regards to sexual health and HIV prevention? Lets this panel tell you. With U=U, we can end HIV/AIDS in Canada, so find out how.

Panelist: Trevor Stratton is a 53-year old member of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation near Toronto, Canada with mixed English and Ojibwe heritage. Diagnosed with HIV in 1990, Trevor turned to his community and the Indigenous HIV and AIDS movement for support and became an activist, volunteer and consultant. He is now the Coordinator for the International Indigenous Working Group on HIV & AIDS (IIWGHA) for its host organization, the Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network (CAAN). Trevor is a board member of the Global Network of People living with HIV (GNP+), the President of the board of 2-Spirited People of the 1st Nations in Toronto and he is one of two North American delegates in the NGO Delegation on the Programme Coordinating Board (PCB) of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS (UNAIDS).

Trevor was recently installed as the Interim Executive Director of the International Indigenous HIV & AIDS Community.

Jason Maclennan (Moderator): Jason has been involved in the HIV movement for approximately thirty years. Over the last few years he has met with various political leaders including the current sitting Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne. He has participated in many presentations to organizations. Jason is very straight forward kind of person who has accomplished many things within the HIV sector. Jason recently educated the North Bay pride Committee to endorse the U=U Campaign and adopt the Ontario Accord GIPA/MIPA.

35 Years of AIDS Activism

Saturday, June 23, 2018, 7:00pm – 8:30pm

Innis Town Hall, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Ave., Toronto, ON M5S 1J5

Join us to hear about the real life exploits of a diverse group of activists, people of all ages and backgrounds, who have fought to get and keep HIV/AIDS in the public eye over the past 35 years. Panelists will talk about the early days of the struggle and more recent advocacy successes that would not have been possible without the voices of those whose lives have been touched by HIV: “Nothing about us without us!”.

Join us to hear about the real life exploits of a diverse group of activists, people of all ages and backgrounds, who have fought to get and keep HIV/AIDS in the public eye over the past 35 years. Panelists will talk about the early days of the struggle and more recent advocacy successes that would not have been possible without the voices of those whose lives have been touched by HIV: “Nothing about us without us!”.

Source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/events/pridepanels-1.4683903